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TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club – Winter Registration Opens December 1st!

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“…my library / Was dukedom large enough…”
– Prospero, The Tempest, 1.2 –

The TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club is a FREE readers’ theatre program for Bards-to-be, ages 7-12!

Join Shakespeare in Action for storytelling adventures!  Explore worlds of magic, ghosts, silly mix-ups, and swordplay in some of the greatest stories ever told!

Jump into plays like Romeo & Juliet, Macbeth, Midsummer Night’s Dream, Tempest, Comedy of Errors, and Henry IV.

Play drama games, read aloud from one to three scripts, build confidence, get a head start on high school, and make friends with other Shakespeare fans!

The TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club is led by professional actors and educators. Register in person at your chosen participating Toronto Public Library branch from the list below:

SATURDAYS, January 30 – March 5, 2016
Registration Opens December 1, 2015

Morning  (10AM – 12PM)

Afternoon  (2PM – 4PM)

Help us spread the word by sharing this post through your social media outlets!

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TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club – Extend your young Bard’s learning with these click-and-print resources!

...and act a little out.

Are your young Bards participating in the Fall session of the TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club?  Or have they participated in the past?

If so, we have some free click-and-print activities for them to try at home and extend their learning!

Click here, scroll to the bottom of the page, and click the green “Download Now” button.

Registration for the Winter session opens December 1st!  For more information click here.

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TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club – Fall Registration Opens October 1st!

td-shakespeare-for-kids-library-club

“…my library / Was dukedom large enough…”
– Prospero, The Tempest, 1.2 –

The TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club is a FREE readers’ theatre program for Bards-to-be, ages 7-12!

Join Shakespeare in Action for storytelling adventures!  Explore worlds of magic, ghosts, silly mix-ups, and swordplay in some of the greatest stories ever told!

Jump into plays like Romeo & Juliet, Macbeth, Midsummer Night’s Dream, Tempest, Comedy of Errors, and Henry IV.

Play drama games, read aloud from one to three scripts, build confidence, get a head start on high school, and make friends with other Shakespeare fans!

The TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club is led by professional actors and educators. Register in person at your chosen participating Toronto Public Library branch from the list below:

SATURDAYS, November 7 – December 12, 2015
Registration Opens October 1, 2015

Morning  (10AM – 12PM)

Afternoon  (2PM – 4PM)

Help us spread the word by sharing this post through your social media outlets!

 shakespeare-in-action-logo     td-bank-logo
toronto-public-library-logo

The Early Bard Gets the Discount- Book Now!

The 2015/16 season has just begun, and we cannot wait to bring Shakespeare Meets Hip Hop and Suddenly Shakespeare directly to your school! As a special bonus, we are offering an Early Bard discount if you book before October 16, 2015!*

Shakespeare Meets Hip Hop- November 23- December 4, 2015 and April 18- May 6, 2016

Shakespeare Meets Hip Hop is a vibrant, interactive presentation that demonstrates how modern hip-hop shares many similarities with the themeslanguage and rhythm used by Shakespeare. Both are full of poetry, word play and lyricism, and both deal with what it is to be human.

The presentation features three professional actors, thumb-nail sketches of Shakespeare’s life and times, and key scenes & speeches from Shakespeare’s most popularly studied plays – including MacbethRomeo & Juliet and Hamlet.

Shakespeare Meets Hip Hop brings alive the parallels between the world of the plays and their own contemporary experience. It’s the perfect complement to your in-class teaching of a specific play, in the beginning, in the middle or at the end.

Suddenly Shakespeare- April 4-15, 2016

This Spring, Shakespeare in Action brings Kim Selody’s sparking production of Suddenly Shakespeare to your school.

This hour long performance brings four of Shakespeare’s best-loved plays –Romeo and Juliet, The Tempest, Macbeth and Twelfth Night – to life for children ages five to seventy-five. Featuring music, dance and physical comedy, the performance is the perfect introduction to Shakespeare for young audiences.

Shakespeare in Action’s Artistic Director, Michael Kelly, describes the show as “a feast of magic, laughter, music and spectacle.” He says, “Suddenly Shakespeare will knock your kids’ socks off! Shakespeare’s stories are so magical, and the show allows kids, no matter what their age, to really participate with the material in a fun and engaging way.”

*Book either of these shows before October 16, 2015, and SAVE $50!

For more information, or to book, please call (416) 703-4881, or e-mail info@shakespeareinaction.org!

Doug Miller Books – What do you read, my lord?

In the summer of 2014, we posted an interview with Doug Miller, our beloved local bookmonger.  Since then, he has moved across the street, to 650 Bloor Street West and opened the door to a larger store, which offers a great selection of discounted adult fiction and non-fiction; children’s picture books and novels; as well as many comics.  It’s one of BuzzFeed’s 35 Charming Canadian Bookstores You Need To Visit, and the now not-so-hidden gem of Korea town.

 

Doug Miller and his LEGO desk, which currently boasts 28,482 blocks!

Doug Miller and his LEGO desk, which currently boasts 28,482 blocks!

 

“Business is better than ever,” says Doug.  “Some people did not see us across the street.  I lost count over 400 people welcoming us to the neighbourhood…They were shocked that they didn’t see us.  Now they see us.”  Doug has some theories as to why his store is being noticed more on the north side of the street – it’s sunnier, there’s more retail, and all the subway entrances/exits are on the same side.

 

New $1-$3 section, 8 bookcases long

New $1-$3 section, 8 bookcases long

 

Whatever the reason, the store is bigger and has better lighting, which Doug points out.  “Soon you’ll be able to get wheelchairs down every aisle.  People can bring their carriages in.  It’ll be a lot easier to maneuver around; it will be more comfortable to shop here.”

 

A Shakespeare find in the amongst the advanced picture books!

A Shakespeare find in the amongst the advanced picture books!

Marvel at the Marvel comics!

Marvel at the Marvel comics!

A great store for children's books

A great store for children’s books

 

Doug has seen all kinds of kids in his store.  He recently had a run on Judy Blume books, because she was in Toronto (at the Toronto Reference Library’s Bram & Bluma Appel Salon) and there was a lot of press.  From classics to dystopian worlds, Robert Munsch to Lois Lowry to Louis Sachar, Doug enjoys making recommendations for his young patrons: “What kind of books have you read in the past?” he asks.  And when he finds the perfect book, all he has to say is: “Your parents won’t like this, but you will.” And that usually seals the deal.

 

Bumpkin, the resident rabbit

Bumpkin, the resident rabbit

 

“I’ve had Bumpkin for 13 years,” says Doug.  “I know his habits.  He’s very calm; he’s very relaxed.  There are sometimes when that changes. One night I forgot to put the music on for him, and I came here in the morning – his water bowl was flipped over; he took his food dish and he had obviously whipped it.  There was kibble everywhere.  He didn’t destroy any of the books, but you could tell he was angry ’cause he likes the sound of the music at night and he missed it.”  In case you’re wondering, Bumpkin has a fondness for jazz and CBC Radio.

 

One of the new shelf labels

One of the new shelf labels

 

By this August, Doug Miller will have been working in the book trade for 30 years.  “Books,” he says, “are more popular than ever.  The demand for certain books is always increasing.  Classics are steadily moving out from the store.  People are re-discovering the book in its oldest form – a sold, hand-held, page-turning piece of art.”

Summer Camp – Day 19 – “Hamlet” (Teen Camp Show!)

The play in pictures – a mix of photos from the morning’s dress rehearsal and the final show:

- Young Co. for Teens -  L-R: 3 Lords, Laertes, Ophelia, King Claudius, Queen Gertrude, Hamlet.  King Claudius:

– Young Co. for Teens –
L-R: 3 Lords, Laertes, Ophelia, King Claudius, Queen Gertrude, Hamlet. King Claudius: “Though yet of Hamlet, our dear brother’s death, the memory be green…”

Horatio tells his good friend, Hamlet, about a Ghost: "A figure like your father, armed at point exactly, appears..."

Horatio tells his good friend, Hamlet, about a Ghost: “A figure like your father, armed at point exactly, appears…”

L-R: Polonius, Laertes, Ophelia.  Polonius blesses his son before his son leaves for France.

L-R: Polonius, Laertes, Ophelia. Polonius blesses his son before his son leaves for France.

L-R: Polonius and his daughter, Ophelia.  Ophelia: [Hamlet] hath, my lord, of late made many tenders of his affection to me.

L-R: Polonius and his daughter, Ophelia. Ophelia: [Hamlet] hath, my lord, of late made many tenders of his affection to me.”

L-R: Marcellus, Hamlet, Horatio see the Ghost and jump back. Hamlet:

L-R: Marcellus, Hamlet, Horatio see the Ghost and jump back. Hamlet: “Angels and ministers of grace defend us!”

L-R: Ghost of Hamlet Senior, Horatio, Hamlet, Marcellus - a photo taken from the balcony earlier in the week.

L-R: Ghost of Hamlet Senior, Horatio, Hamlet, Marcellus – a photo taken from the balcony earlier in the week.

The Ghost of Hamlet Senior speaks to Hamlet: "I am thy father's spirit...If thou didst ever thy dear father love, revenge his foul and most unnatural murder."  Hamlet feigns madness to seek out the truth.

The Ghost of Hamlet Senior speaks to Hamlet: “I am thy father’s spirit…If thou didst ever thy dear father love, revenge his foul and most unnatural murder.” Hamlet feigns madness to seek out the truth.

L-R: Polonius and Ophelia, who describes her frightful encounter with Hamlet.

L-R: Polonius and Ophelia, who describes her frightful encounter with Hamlet.

L-R: Guildenstern, Rosencrantz, King Claudius, Queen Gertrude.  The King and Queen ask the two to find the cause of Hamlet's madness.

L-R: Guildenstern, Rosencrantz, King Claudius, Queen Gertrude. The King and Queen ask the two to find the cause of Hamlet’s madness.

L-R: Queen Gertrude, Polonius, King Claudius.  Polonius reads Hamlet's love letter, , believing love to be the cause of Hamlet's madness.

L-R: Queen Gertrude, Polonius, King Claudius. Polonius reads Hamlet’s love letter, believing love to be the cause of Hamlet’s madness.

Hamlet "reads." Note the orientation of the book.

Hamlet “reads.” Note the orientation of the book.

L-R: Hamlet, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern.  Hamlet knows his friends are reporting to the King:

L-R: Hamlet, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern. Hamlet knows his friends are reporting to the King: “I am but mad north-north-west…I know a hawk from a hand-saw.”

The Players arrive.  Hamlet will have them act "The Murder of Gonzago," a story that mirrors the murder of Hamlet Senior.  He wants to see King Claudius' reaction - to "catch his conscience."

The Players arrive. Hamlet will have them act “The Murder of Gonzago,” a story that mirrors the murder of Hamlet Senior. He wants to see King Claudius’ reaction – to “catch his conscience.”

Hamlet:

Hamlet: “To be, or not to be, that is the question…”

Ophelia is shaken; Hamlet suspects that her father, Polonius, is spying:

Ophelia is shaken; Hamlet suspects that her father, Polonius, is spying: “Let the doors be shut upon him…”

L-R: Players, Hamlet, Horatio. Hamlet:

L-R: Players, Hamlet, Horatio. Hamlet: “There is a play to-night before the king…Observe mine uncle…”

L-R: Guildenstern and Rosencrantz watch "The Murder of Gonzago" - Hamlet's "mouse-trap."  The play within the play was filmed and shown on screen.

L-R: Guildenstern and Rosencrantz watch “The Murder of Gonzago” – Hamlet’s “mouse-trap.” The play within the play was filmed and shown on screen.

L-R: Players, Hamlet, Guildenstern, Rosencrantz. Hamlet: "Do you think I am easier to be play'd on than a pipe?"

L-R: Players, Hamlet, Guildenstern, Rosencrantz. Hamlet: “Do you think I am easier to be play’d on than a pipe?”

L-R: King Claudius and Hamlet.  Hamlet:

L-R: King Claudius and Hamlet. Hamlet: “Now might I do it pat, now he is praying…”

Queen Gertrude tells King Claudius that Hamlet has killed Polonius (his death scene was on film).

Queen Gertrude tells King Claudius that Hamlet has killed Polonius (his death scene was on film).

Ophelia unravels after her father's death, descends into madness and sings: "He is dead and gone, lady..."

Ophelia unravels after her father’s death, descends into madness and sings: “He is dead and gone, lady…”

L-R: Laertes, Queen Gertrude, King Claudius.  Laertes:

L-R: Laertes, Queen Gertrude, King Claudius. Laertes: “Where is my father?…How came he dead?”

Ophelia:

Ophelia: “And in his grave rain’d many a tear…”

Laertes:

Laertes: “Dear maid, kind sister, sweet Ophelia!”

King Claudius and Laertes plot revenge against Halmet. The King will set up a duel, through which Laertes can kill Hamlet. King Claudius: "Revenge should have no bounds."

King Claudius and Laertes plot revenge against Halmet. The King will set up a duel, through which Laertes can kill Hamlet. King Claudius: “Revenge should have no bounds.”

Ophelia has drowned.  Laertes:

Ophelia has drowned. Laertes: “I have a speech of fire, but this folly douts it.”

L-R: Clown and Hamlet.  Hamlet:

L-R: Clown and Hamlet. Hamlet: “Whose grave’s this, sirrah?”

Hamlet:

Hamlet: “Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio…”

Laertes and Hamlet grapple in Ophelia's grave, as other rush to intervene.

Laertes and Hamlet grapple in Ophelia’s grave, as other rush to intervene.

L-R: Attendants, Laertes, King Claudius, Queen Gertrude, Hamlet, Attendant, Horatio.  Hamlet:

L-R: Attendants, Laertes, King Claudius, Queen Gertrude, Hamlet, Attendant, Horatio. Hamlet: “I loved Ophelia: forty thousand brothers could not, with all their quantity of love, make up my sum.”

L-R: Hamlet and Osric, who presents the wager.

L-R: Hamlet and Osric, who presents the wager.

L-R: Laertes, King Claudius, Hamlet.

L-R: Laertes, King Claudius, Hamlet.

L-R: Laertes and Osric. Laertes chooses a

L-R: Laertes and Osric. Laertes chooses a “sword unbated” anointed “with contagion.”

Osric presents the foils to Hamlet, as King Claudius stands by.

Osric presents the foils to Hamlet, as King Claudius stands by.

King Claudius announces the wager.

King Claudius announces the wager.

L-R: Queen Gertrude, Osric, Hamlet, Lord, Horatio.  Queen Gertrude offers Hamlet a drink which, unbeknownst to her, is poisoned.  Hamlet refuses...and Gertrude drinks it.

L-R: Queen Gertrude, Osric, Hamlet, Lord, Horatio. Queen Gertrude offers Hamlet a drink which, unbeknownst to her, is poisoned. Hamlet refuses…and Gertrude drinks it.

Osric:

Osric: “Nothing, neither way.”

Centre: Osric tends to the wounded Laertes. Right: Queen Gertrude collapses in Hamlet's arms.  Hamlet, too, is near death.  Queen Gertrude: "The drink, the drink! I am poison'd."

Centre: Osric tends to the wounded Laertes. Right: Queen Gertrude collapses in Hamlet’s arms. Hamlet, too, is near death. Queen Gertrude: “The drink, the drink! I am poison’d.”

Hamlet poisons King Claudius:

Hamlet poisons King Claudius: “Thou incestuous, murderous, damned Dane, drink off this potion…”

Hamlet dies in Horatio's arms.

Hamlet dies in Horatio’s arms.

Horatio (far right):

Horatio (far right): “Now cracks a noble heart. Good night sweet prince: And flights of angels sing thee to thy rest!”

The cast and directing team!

The cast and directing team!

Oh dear...

Oh dear…

Joe, Director

Joe, Director & Filmmaker

Sabio, Assistant Director

Sabio, Assistant Director

Gabriella, Assistant Director, Kids' Camp

Gabriella, Assistant Director, Kids’ Camp

Isabelle, Summer Student

Isabelle, Summer Student

Summer Camp – Day 18

The duel between Hamlet and Laertes was going to be on film, but it was later shifted to the stage, so that everyone could be together in front of the audience at the end of the show.

Much of the morning was spent tweaking and rehearsing the duel, as well as the deaths of Queen Gertrude, King Claudius, Laertes, and Hamlet.

 

- Young Co. for Teens -  Joe watches as the ensemble rehearses the graveyard scene.

– Young Co. for Teens –
Joe watches as the ensemble rehearses the penultimate scene of the play – the graveyard grapple.

Claudius joins Laertes' & Hamlet's hands.

Claudius joins Laertes’ & Hamlet’s hands.

Osric presents the foils to Laertes.

Osric presents the foils to Laertes.

Laertes and Hamlet prepare to duel.

Laertes and Hamlet prepare to duel.