The Comedy of Errors

Shakespeare Summer Camp for Kids- 2011 Production of The Comedy of Errors!

Over the course of 2 weeks, campers will work towards creating their very own Shakespeare production! Summer Camp runs from June 29- July 10, 2015, Monday-Friday at our headquarters in Toronto. Campers will learn to act, sing, improvise, construct costumes, and design sets, all leading up to a final performance for their friends and families! Check out some footage of our Summer Camp production of The Comedy of Errors from 2011!

For more information, or to register for camp, visit our Shakespeare Summer Camp for Kids page!

Have a teen that is looking to step into the spotlight this summer too? Visit our Young Company for Teens page to find out more about our Summer training Program in stage and film performance!

The Shakespeare Challenge- Check out our live auction packages!

There are only a few days left until the Shakespeare Challenge fundraising gala, and the SIA team, along with our Challenge Champions are putting the final touches on The Comedy of Errors, as well as the live and silent auction! Here is a sneak peak at what guests will be able to bid on in the live auction right after the show!

Montreal Trip– Take a round trip for 2 to Montreal, courtesy of VIA Rail to attend the Talk of the Fest Show from July 20-26 at the Just for Laughs Festival! Enjoy accommodations for one night provided by Delta Downtown Montreal, and brunch provided by Vieux-Port Steakhouse.

Value: $1116

Cottage Stay– Spend 2 nights at a beautiful 2 bedroom cottage overlooking Lake Erie. Valid from October- November for a perfect Fall getaway!

Value: $300

Oakdale Golf and Country Club- Enjoy a round of golf for 4 at the Oakdale Golf and Country Club in Toronto! Valid until Dec. 31, 2015.

*Please note that a $60 host caddy fee is also required.

Value: $700

Niagara-on-the-Lake Experience- Spend 2 nights at Aqua Bella B&B, and enjoy 2 tickets to a Shaw Festival Show. Complete your trip with a romantic wine tasting experience for 2 at Chateau des Charmes in Niagara-on-the-Lake.

Value: $510

Stratford Festival Stay- Spend the night at Caledonia House, and see a show at the Stratford Festival during the 2015 season. Winners will also be treated to a complimentary tour of the Festival’s props and costumes warehouse!

Value: $345

Whole Beast Butchery Demo- Learn how to expertly cut your meats with a butchering class demonstration for 8 people at Sanagan’s Meat Locker.

Value: $750

The silent auction will have many more amazing packages to bid on! To join us for the Shakespeare Challenge, please visit our website to purchase tickets!

Win Tickets to the 4th annual Shakespeare Challenge!

Shakespeare in Action is holding the 4th annual Shakespeare Challenge fundraising gala on March 25, 2015 at The Arts and Letters Club of Toronto, and we want you to join us!

V - Shakespeare in Action - Shakespeare Challenge - 2013 - Trinculo is Reeling Ripe

The Cast of The Tempest from the 2013 Shakespeare Challenge

For the past three years, community members from the corporate sector fearlessly took to the stage in productions of William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Tempest, and Twelfth Night to raise funds for Shakespeare In Action’s educational programming. Their generosity has helped to foster literacy, enhance creativity and promote speech arts for youth at risk in Toronto’s priority neighborhoods.

This year, The Challenge will feature twelve community members coming together to unleash their inner Shakespeare under the direction of Shakespeare in Action’s renowned Artistic Director Michael Kelly. Our Challenge Champions will perform an abridged version of The Comedy of Errors. In a race against time, these brave souls have rehearsed one night a week for eight weeks to prepare and present this memorable production. That’s the Shakespeare Challenge!

We are giving away a pair of tickets to the Shakespeare Challenge, where guests will be treated to a performance of The Comedy of Errors, food and drink, and a live and silent auction with fabulous packages, including a trip for 2 to Montreal to attend a Just For Laughs event, wine tasting tours, golfing passestheatre tickets, and many more! Most importantly, all funds raised will go towards Shakespeare in Action’s educational programming, giving access to the arts to students in priority neighbourhoods across Toronto!

HOW TO ENTER:

To enter, all you have to do is send an e-mail to jenny@shakespeareinaction.org with your name and contact information, and tell me who your favourite character from The Comedy of Errors is!

Contest closes at 11:59PM on Friday, March 20, 2015. Winner will be selected at random and contacted via phone or email. 

Good luck to everyone who enters!

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS- STAGE MANAGER AND COSTUME DESIGNER

O - Shakespeare in Action - Shakespeare Challenge - 2013 - The Island is Full of Noises

Shakespeare in Action is looking for a volunteer Stage Manager and volunteer Costume Designer to help bring to life The Comedy of Errors as part of the 4th annual Shakespeare Challenge fundraiser. The Shakespeare Challenge is a fundraising event that benefits youth literacy from Toronto’s priority neighbourhoods by allowing them to experience exceptional professional theatre and educational programming through the works of Shakespeare that they would otherwise not have access to!

The Challenge will feature eleven community members coming together to unleash their inner Shakespearean acting skills under the direction of Shakespeare in Action’s renowned Artistic Director Michael Kelly. Our Challenge Champions will rehearse and perform an abridged version of The Comedy of Errors. In a race against time, these brave souls will rehearse one night a week for eight weeks to prepare and present this memorable production. That’s the Shakespeare Challenge!

The Stage Manager will be responsible for:

  • Organizing rehearsal schedules
  • Preparing list of contacts
  • Maintaining weekly contact with participants, informing of them of any changes, updates, etc.
  • Assisting Director with recording blocking and taking other necessary notes with Stage Management Prompt Book
  • Organizing and maintain rehearsal space
  • Liaising with Shakespeare in Action office staff regularly throughout the duration of the rehearsals

Must be available for the following dates and times:

  • 6:30 pm-9:30 pm on January 20, 27, February 3, 10, 24, March 3, 10, 17, 2015
  • The dress rehearsal on March 24 , 2015 and final performance on March 25, 2015 (Times TBD)

The Costume Designer will be responsible for:

  • Meeting with Director and cast members to discuss ideas and vision for character costumes
  • Creating appropriate costumes for the show using Shakespeare in Action’s costume collection
  • Purchasing or renting any additional costume pieces required.

Must be available for the following dates and times:

  • 6:30 pm-9:30 pm on February 24, March 3, 10, 17, 2015
  • The dress rehearsal on March 24 , 2015 and final performance on March 25, 2015 (Times TBD)

If you are interested in applying for either of these positions, please send a resume and cover letter to jenny@shakespeareinaction.org. Cover Letters can be addressed to Michael Kelly, Artistic Director.

The Shakespeare Challenge 2015- Registration is open!

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The 2014 cast of Twelfth Night
Photo Credit: Jim Goad

For the past three years, community members from the corporate sector fearlessly took to the stage in productions of William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Tempest, and Twelfth Night to raise funds for Shakespeare In Action’s subsidized ticket program. Their generosity has helped to foster literacy, enhance creativity and promote speech arts for youth at risk in Toronto’s priority neighborhoods.

This year, we are looking for a group of courageous community members to volunteer their time to rehearse and perform an abridged version of one of Shakespeare’s most beloved tales of mistaken identity, The Comedy of Errors, at the Historic Arts and Letters Club of Toronto.

Upon registration, each champion will make a tax deductible deposit of $100.00, and will commit to attending scheduled rehearsals, selling a minimum of 8 tickets to the final performance on March 25, 2015.

To register, click on the Register Now button below! The deadline to register to December 19, 2014.
Participants must be at least 18 years old.

Eventbrite - Shakespeare Challenge 2015- Performer Registration

Rehearsals for the Shakespeare Challenge will take place on Tuesday nights from 6:30- 9:30PM on the following dates:

  • January 20, 2015
  • January 27, 2015
  • February 3, 2015
  • February 10, 2015
  • February 24, 2015
  • March 3, 2015
  • March 10, 2015
  • March 17, 2015
  • March 24, 2014 (Dress Rehearsal)
  • March 25, 2014 (Final Show)

Rehearsal space TBD

If you would like for information about joining the Shakespeare Challenge 2015, or would like to find out how else you can get involved, please visit the Shakespeare Challenge page, or send us an e-mail!

Shakespeare Summer Camp for Kids- 2011 Production of The Comedy of Errors

Our Shakespeare Kids and Teens create and perform their own versions of Shakespeare’s plays at our Shakespeare Summer Camp for Kids and Young Company for Teens training program!
Over the course of two (Kids’s camp) or three (Teen camp) weeks, campers build a show from the ground up, leading up to a final performance for friends and family on the last day of camp! Here is some footage from the final performance of The Comedy of Errors in 2011. The kids campers did a fantastic job on this production!

The deadline to register for camp is June 25th, and there are limited spots left at both camps! Kids can register here, and teens can register here.

We can’t wait to see everyone on the first day of camp!

Shakespeare at the Movies- The Oscars 2014

The nominations for the 2014 Academy Awards are in, and I must say, there is some fierce competition for a statue this year!
Until the awards are actually given out on March 2, we can only speculate on the internet and join the office pool, guessing who will walk away a winner. In the meantime, we can dive into the nominees past works, and learn about the interesting and brilliant choices that this group of actors have made throughout their careers.

Seeing as we are a Shakespeare related theatre company, I have sifted though the careers of the nominees and compiled a list of some of the Shakespeare related works that they have been a part of over the years! Enjoy!

christian-bale-american-hustle

Christian Bale (Best Actor Nominee)

Appeared in:

chiwetel-ejiofor-12-years-a-slave

Chiwetel Ejiofor (Best Actor Nominee)

Appeared in:

  • Macbeth (1997 theatre production) as Malcom
  • Romeo and Juliet (2000 theatre production) as Romeo
  • Twelfth Night, or What You Will (2003 TV movie) as Orsino
  • Othello (2007 theatre production) as Othello

leonardo-dicaprio-the-wolf-of-wall-street

Leonardo DiCaprio (Best Actor Nominee)

Appeared in:

amy-adams-american-hustle

Amy Adams (Best Actress Nominee)

Appeared in:

  • Into the Woods (2012 Shakespeare in the Park Production) as Baker’s Wife

cate-blanchett-blue-jasmine

Cate Blanchett (Best Actress Nominee)

Appeared in:

  • Richard II (2009 Sydney Festival) as Richard II


*Fun Fact- This role was part of a show called The War of the Roses, which condensed all of Shakespeare’s historical plays into one 8 hour performance!

judi-dench-philomena

Judi Dench (Best Actress Nominee)

Appeared in:


*Fun Fact- Judi Dench also performed with The Royal Shakespeare Company for many years.

meryl-streep-august-osage-county

Meryl Streep (Best Actress Nominee)

Appeared in:

  • The Taming of the Shrew (1978 Shakespeare in the Park Production)  as Katherine
  • Romeo and Juliet (2012 Shakespeare in the Park Staged Reading) as Juliet

michael-fassbender-12-years-a-slave

Michael Fassbender (Best Supporting Actor Nominee)

Appearing in:

  • Macbeth (Currently in Pre-production) as Macbeth

sally-hawkins

Sally Hawkins (Best Supporting Actress Nominee)

Appeared in:

  • Much Ado About Nothing (2000 theatre production)
  • A Midsummer Night’s Dream (2000 theatre production)

lupita-nyongo-12-years-a-slave

Lupita Nyong’o (Best Supporting Actress Nominee)

Appeared in:

  • The Winter’s Tale (Yale School of Drama Production)
  • The Taming of the Shrew (Yale School of Drama Production)

Have you seen any of these movies or performances? What did you think? Leave a comment and let us know!

Wordy Wednesday – “Neither rhyme nor reason”

‘I got my rhyme on my reason and my reason on my rhyme’…sounds like the start of a hit by rap duo, Rhyme2Reason 😎

The two nouns are synonymous with each other:

  • ‘Rhyme’ refers to a set structure, poetic metre, a correspondence between words.
  • ‘Reason’ is clarity, a logical cause, an explanation for an event.

So to have neither rhyme nor reason is to have no common sense.

The phrase occurs twice in Shakespeare’s works. First in The Comedy of Errors (1590), when Dromio tries to take the ease off his master’s scolding:

DROMIO OF SYRACUSE :
Was there ever any man thus beaten out of season,
When in the why and the wherefore is neither rhyme nor reason?

II.ii.47-48

And later in As You Like It (1600), as Orlando professes his love for Rosalind (who is disguised in the scene):

ROSALIND: But are you so much in love as your rhymes speak?
ORLANDO: Neither rhyme nor reason can express how much.

III.ii.398-399

In both cases, the phrase is used to express a situation that’s inexpressible. But the tone in HOW it is uttered, differs. Check it out…

Dromio mentions ‘neither rhyme nor reason’ to convey the meaningless use of the words, ‘why’ and ‘wherefore’. He utters it in a sarcastic tone to reveal an unintelligent situation. But Orlando utters ‘neither rhyme nor reason’ to express a love that transcends mere words. His tone is more uplifting, and shows that the emotion of love is beyond intelligent structure and logic.

While Shakespeare popularized the phrase, its origins can be traced before The Bard’s time. ‘Neither rhyme nor reason’ stems from the French term, Na Ryme ne Raison, with its earliest English usage coming from sources including:

  • John Russell – The Boke of Nurture, 1460 (‘As for ryme or reson, ye forewryter was not to blame…’).
  • Sir Thomas More (1478-1535) – The English writer utters the term while critiquing an author’s manuscript (‘Now it is somewhat, for now it is rhyme; whereas before it was neither rhyme nor reason.’)

By: Vineeta Moraes

Sources:
http://www.bartleby.com/100/125.32.html#125.note15
Rhyme nor Reason – http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/301500.html
Oxford English Dictionary – http://www.oed.com/
The Concise Dictionary of English Etymology  – George Latimer Apperson and Martin H. Manser
Common Phrases: And Where They Come From – Myron Korach and John Mordock

What if Shakespeare…were a SPORTS COMMENTATOR?

 

Image

A happy evening [1] and ye’re welcome all [2]. We first address toward you [3] that stay’d at home [4], and they that watch [5] from yonder [6] elsewhere / from me far off [7], a hundred thousand welcomes [8]. This great sport [9] is now the two hours’ traffic of our stage [10]. And mark thee [11] well worth watching [12].

And all that are assembled in this place [13] that wait [14] with bated breath [15], lend me your ears [16]. Hark! hark! what shout is that [17] among the crowd? [18] And, hark! they shout for joy [19]. Thus we are agreed [20] what sport tonight [21] you shall see [22].

Be the players ready? [23] Ajax is ready [24] And look you [25] Percy is already in the field [26]. With roaring voices [27] the shouting plebeians [28] bid the players make haste [29]. Hark, they roar! [30] loud shouts and salutations from their mouths [31]. Alas, what joy! [32] There are the players [33]. Aeneas is a-field [34.] At last, though long [35] now I see [36] Anthony is come into the field [37]. Then shall we have a match [38].

Ajax goes up and down the field [39]. On there, pass along! [40] He scores, he scores [41] This cheers my heart [42]. He knows the game [43] excellent well [44]. Hark, the game is roused! [45] Shouts and claps out-voice the deep mouth’d sea [46].

And then begin again and stop again [47]. The match [48] is tied [49]. Methought that Gloucester stumbled [50]. They stumble that run fast [51]. Let’s see the penalty, [52] who takes it? [53] The thrice-victorious Lord of Falconbridge [54]. No no, it cannot be! [55] he hath miss’d [56]. The people in the street cry [57] you base football player [58].

And then the people fell a-shouting [59]. But where’s the great Alcides of the field, / Valiant Lord Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury [61]. He has been yonder [61] on the bench [62]. And in all this time [63] why he, of all the rest, hath never moved [64]. With open outcry [65] the crowd [66] call him forth [67], a most gallant fellow [68] to win this easy match [69]. Here he comes [70] once more unto the breach [71]. Hark! do you not hear the / people cry [72] roaring louder than / the sea or weather [73].

It grows very late [74], the sport is at the best [75] when none can call [76] – who loses and who wins; who’s in, who’s out [77]. My heart leaps [78] breathless and faint [79], I cannot bring / my tongue to such a pace [80]. But look thee here [81] brave Talbot [82] how he outruns the wind and with what care / he cranks and crosses with a thousand doubles [83.]

The game is up! [84] Victorious Talbot [85] now hath won the day [86]. Didst thou not hear their shouts? [87] The ways of glory [88] would scarce make that be believed [89]. Renowned Talbot [90] he hath done well in people’s eyes, / hearing applause and universal shout, / giddy in spirit, still gazing in a doubt / whether these pearls of praise be his or no [91].

The games are done [92] This had been cheerful after victory [93]. O my soul’s joy! [94] I saw not better sport these seven years’ day [95]. A thousand thanks and [96] fare thee well [97]. In celebration of this day [98] applause and loving shout [99] shall be heard [100] through the streets [101]. Why, then, good night indeed [102].

Shakespeare – re-arranged by Linda Nicoll

1.        Two Gentlemen of Verona [V. i. 2056]

2.       Coriolanus [II. i. 1113]

3.       King Lear [I. i. 204]

4.       Pericles [II. iv. 553]

5.       Rape of Lucrece [1626]

6.       Henry VI P I [III. ii. 1466]

7.       Sonnet 61 [13-14]

8.       Coriolanus [II, i. 1114]

9.       Henry VIII [I. i. 88]

10.     Romeo and Juliet [Prologue 1, 12]

11.     Henry IV P I [II. iv. 1196]

12.     Cymbeline [II. iv. 1257]

13.     The Comedy of Errors [V. i. 1841]

14.     Two Gentlemen of Verona [IV. ii. 1770]

15.     The Merchant of Venice [I. iii. 451]

16.     Julius Caesar [III. Ii. 1617]

17.     Troilus and Cressida [V. ix. 3619]

18.     Henry VIII [IV. i. 2481]

19.     Julius Caesar [V. iii. 2528]

20.     Anthony and Cleopatra II. vi. 1283

21.     Anthony and Cleopatra [I. ii. 57]

22.     All’s Well That Ends Well [III. Vi. 1824]

23.     Hamlet III. [I. i. 1986-87]

24.     Troilus and Cressida [III. iii. 1901]

25.     All’s Well That Ends Well [V. iii. 3032]

26.     Henry IV PI [IV. ii. 2443-44]

27.     King Lear [II. iii. 1265]

28.     Anthony and Cleopatra [IV. xii. 2942]

29.     Hamlet [III. ii. 1925]

30.     The Tempest [IV. i. 2008]

31.     Henry IV P I [III. ii. 1876]

32.     Henry VI P I [IV. iii. 2967]

33.     Hamlet [II. ii. 1452]

34.     Troilus and Cressida [V. iii. 3354]

35.     Taming of the Shrew [V. ii. 2489]

36.     All’s Well That Ends Well [I. iii. 492]

37.     Anthony and Cleopatra [IV. vi. 2713]

38.     All’s Well That Ends Well [V. iii. 2708]

39.     Troilus and Cressida [[III. iii. 2129]

40.     Anthony and Cleopatra [III. i. 1589]

41.     All’s Well That Ends Well [IV. iii. 2307]

42.     Henry VI P III [V. iv. 2870]

43.     Henry VI P III [III. ii. 1484]

44.     Hamlet [II. ii. 1279]

45.     Cymbeline [III. iii 1708]

46.     Henry V [V. Chorus, 2849]

47.     Richard III [III. v 2071]

48.     The Comedy of Errors [III. ii. 854]

49.     Sonnet 137 [8]

50.     Richard III [I. iv. 851]

51.     Romeo and Juliet [II. iii. 156]

52.     Love’s Labour’s Lost I. i. 126]

53.     Coriolanus [IV. vii. 3252]

54.     Henry VI P I [IV. vii. 2324]

55.     All’s Well That Ends Well [II. i. 601]

56.     Cymbeline [I. i. 20]

57.     Romeo and Juliet [V. iii. 3164]

58.     King Lear [I. iv. 615]

59.     Julius Caesar [I. ii. 315]

60.     Henry VI P I [IV. vii. 2317-18]

61.     Twelfth Night [II. v. 1043-44]

62.     Timon of Athens [IV. iii. 1702]

63.     As You Like It [IV. i.1877]

64.     Two Gentlemen of Verona [I. ii. 177]

65.     Romeo and Juliet [V. iii. 3166]

66.     Henry VIII [IV. i. 2481]

67.     Henry IV P I [V. ii. 1517]

68.     All’s Well That Ends Well [III. v. 1701]

69.     King John [III. I 1264]

70.     Coriolanus [II. iii. 1462]

71.     Henry V [III. i. 1092]

72.     Troilus and Cressida [I. ii. 372-73]

73.     The Winter’s Tale [III. iii 1596-97]

74.     Romeo and Juliet [III. iii. 2045]

75.     Romeo and Juliet [I. v. 748]

76.     Macbeth [V. i. 2162]

77.     King Lear [V. iii. 3138]

78.     Pericles [V. iii. 2573]

79.     Henry IV P I [I. iii. 357]

80.     Coriolanus [II. iii. 1476-77]

81.     The Winter’s Tale [III. iii. 1606]

82.     Henry VI P I [II. i. 694-95]

83.     Venus and Adonis [703-4]

84.     Cymbeline [III. iii 1708]

85.     Henry VI P I [II. iii. 900]

86.     Henry VI P III [IV. iv. 2257]

87.     Julius Caesar [V. iii. 2594]

88.     Henry VIII [III. ii. 2349]

89.     All’s Well That Ends Well [IV. i. 1959]

90.     Henry VI P I [IV. iii. 2039]

91.     The Merchant of Venice [III. ii. 1512-15]

92.     Julius Caesar [I. ii. 269]

93.     Henry IV P II [IV. ii. 2535]

94.     Othello [II. i. 975]

95.     Henry VI P II [II. i. 728]

96.     Henry V [IV. iv. 2429]

97.     All’s Well That Ends Well [II. i. 745]

98.     Henry VIII [IV. i. 2389]

99.     Richard III [III. vii. 2240]

100.   King John [I. i. 28]

101.   Anthony and Cleopatra [I. i. 64]

102.   Anthony and Cleopatra [III. x. 2099]

What if Shakespeare…were an INVESTMENT BANKER?

(On the brink of the current financial crisis) 

There is some ill a-brewing towards my rest, / For I did dream of money-bags to-night (1).  I greatly fear my money is not safe (2).  Say ‘tis not so (3).

I pray you sir! (4). I am not in a sportive humour now: / Tell me, and dally not, where is the money? (5). I beseech thee (6), answer me / In what safe place have you bestow’d my money? (7).

There is a written scroll! I’ll read the writing (8).  Mine eyes deceive me (9) It is not so; for how can this be true (10).  This paper has undone me: ‘tis the account / Of all that world of wealth I have drawn together (11).

‘Tis gone, ‘tis gone, ‘tis gone (12), melted into air, into thin air (13).

Alack the day! (14). Time is a very bankrupt, and owes more than he’s worth to season (15).

What hath been cannot be (16). You can fool no more money out of me (17). From this day forth (18) – Neither a borrower nor a lender be (19).

1          The Merchant of Venice [II. v. 865-66]

2          The Comedy of Errors [I. ii 270]

3          Anthony and Cleopatra [II. v. 1138]

4          All’s Well That Ends Well [II. ii. 863]

5          The Comedy of Errors [I.ii.58-59]

6          Anthony and Cleopatra [I. ii. 139]

7          The Comedy of Errors [I.ii.77-78]

8          The Merchant of Venice [II. vii. 1052]

9          The Comedy of Errors [V. i. 1773]

10        Love’s Labour’s Lost [V. ii. 2349]

11        Henry VIII [III. ii. 95-96]

12        Romeo and Juliet [I. v. 642]

13        The Tempest [IV. i. 81]

14        Romeo and Juliet [III. ii. 1760]

15        The Comedy of Errors [IV.ii.58]

16        All’s Well That Ends Well [I. i. 28]

17        Twelfth Night [IV. i. 2227]

18        Julius Caesar [IV. iii. 2030]

19        Hamlet [III. ii. 2091]

Shakespeare re-arranged by Linda Nicoll