Tempest

First Day of Camp in High Park

New this summer:  Shakespeare in Action has partnered with Canadian Stage and Shakespeare in High Park.  Our annual Shakespeare for Kids Summer camp will culminate in final performances on the High Park Community Stage.

 

Today was the first day in High Park! The campers got a chance to see the Shakespeare in High Park stage and check out the space we will be performing on. We rehearsed scenes in the space, picnicked for lunch, and the campers started creating a trailer for the show.

 

Joining us this week in the park is Gillian Murphy, the Youth and Outreach Coordinator at Canadian Stage. Today Gillian interviewed two actors at camp, Joel and Tanya, about the experience of being in the park, Shakespearen language, and their thoughts on their characters.

 

Gillian: So, this is your second week of camp! What were you up to last week?

 

Tanya: We got our characters last week, we played a lot of games, and went outside.

 

G: What’s different about being in the park versus the school?

 

Joel: Well the bathrooms are closer. It’s outside, and yeah that’s pretty much it.

 

G: Have you done Shakespeare in Action camp before?

 

J: No.

 

T: No, but I’ve been [to Shakespeare in High Park]. Last year I saw Hamlet and All’s Well That Ends Well

 

G: Did you know about Shakespeare before the camp?

 

J: Yah, my mom was really into it when I was like four, so then I grew into it. I went to a Shakespeare Camp at the library.

 

G: Cool! Have you acted in a Shakespeare play before?

 

J: No.

 

T: Ya. We did Romeo and Juliet at my school.

 

G: And, what are you playing in this show?

 

T: Sebastian, in the Tempest.

 

G: That’s awesome. What does Sebastian try to accomplish in the play?

 

T: To kill Alonso and Gonzalo because he wants to be king of Naples.

 

And what part do you play Joel?

 

J: The King of Naples, Alonso.

 

G: And what does Alonso want to accomplish in the play?

 

J: To find his lost son, Ferdinand.

 

G: So far, is Shakespeare different from any other acting you’ve done?

 

T: Yes, the words are different. It’s harder to understand because you don’t know what the words are.

 

G: How do you go about understanding them better?

 

T: We have a Shakespeare dictionary so we just search it up and find out what the word is. I think the Master’s first scene we searched up a word for her and that very sentence was in the dictionary.

 

G: What about you Joel, is the language the hardest part?

 

J: Not really. I sort of understand it. Compared to normal acting it’s really different.

 

G: Is it a fun different?

 

J: It’s a nice challenge.

 

G: If I was going to put this on the blog what would you want people to know about your first day in the park?

 

T: It is fun and very interesting. We finally saw the stage, we actually get fresh air, and our whole class doesn’t have to go to the washroom together.

 

J: It’s very nice.

 

T: They should come to the camp!

 

J: And every single show!

 

G: And pay lots of money?

 

J: Yah.

 

Come Catch our Groundlings (age 7 – 10) perform The Tempest on the High Park Community Stage on Friday July 14th at 2:30PM!    If interested, RSVP to education@shakespeareinaction.org.

High Park Community Stage is located on the Shakespeare in High Park premises, beside the High Park Amphitheatre.

Advertisements

TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club – Winter Registration Opens December 1st!

td-shakespeare-for-kids-library-club

“…my library / Was dukedom large enough…”
– Prospero, The Tempest, 1.2 –

The TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club is a FREE readers’ theatre program for Bards-to-be, ages 7-12!

Join Shakespeare in Action for storytelling adventures!  Explore worlds of magic, ghosts, silly mix-ups, and swordplay in some of the greatest stories ever told!

Jump into plays like Romeo & Juliet, Macbeth, Midsummer Night’s Dream, Tempest, Comedy of Errors, and Henry IV.

Play drama games, read aloud from one to three scripts, build confidence, get a head start on high school, and make friends with other Shakespeare fans!

The TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club is led by professional actors and educators. Register in person at your chosen participating Toronto Public Library branch from the list below:

SATURDAYS, January 30 – March 5, 2016
Registration Opens December 1, 2015

Morning  (10AM – 12PM)

Afternoon  (2PM – 4PM)

Help us spread the word by sharing this post through your social media outlets!

 shakespeare-in-action-logo     td-bank-logo
toronto-public-library-logo

TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club – Extend your young Bard’s learning with these click-and-print resources!

...and act a little out.

Are your young Bards participating in the Fall session of the TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club?  Or have they participated in the past?

If so, we have some free click-and-print activities for them to try at home and extend their learning!

Click here, scroll to the bottom of the page, and click the green “Download Now” button.

Registration for the Winter session opens December 1st!  For more information click here.

shakespeare-in-action-logo     td-bank-logo
toronto-public-library-logo

TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club – Fall Registration Opens October 1st!

td-shakespeare-for-kids-library-club

“…my library / Was dukedom large enough…”
– Prospero, The Tempest, 1.2 –

The TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club is a FREE readers’ theatre program for Bards-to-be, ages 7-12!

Join Shakespeare in Action for storytelling adventures!  Explore worlds of magic, ghosts, silly mix-ups, and swordplay in some of the greatest stories ever told!

Jump into plays like Romeo & Juliet, Macbeth, Midsummer Night’s Dream, Tempest, Comedy of Errors, and Henry IV.

Play drama games, read aloud from one to three scripts, build confidence, get a head start on high school, and make friends with other Shakespeare fans!

The TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club is led by professional actors and educators. Register in person at your chosen participating Toronto Public Library branch from the list below:

SATURDAYS, November 7 – December 12, 2015
Registration Opens October 1, 2015

Morning  (10AM – 12PM)

Afternoon  (2PM – 4PM)

Help us spread the word by sharing this post through your social media outlets!

 shakespeare-in-action-logo     td-bank-logo
toronto-public-library-logo

Kids’ Camp – Photos from the “Tempest” show!

Director, Janelle Hanna

Director, Janelle Hanna

- The tempest -

– The tempest in rehearsal –

- Miranda pleas to Prospero -  "If by your art, my dearest father, you have put the wild water in this roar, allay them."

– Miranda pleas to Prospero –
“If by your art, my dearest father, you have put the wild water in this roar, allay them.”

- Prospero tells his tale -  "Miranda, thy father was the Duke of Milan..."

– Prospero tells his tale –
“Miranda, thy father was the Duke of Milan…”

- Prospero's flashback -  "Noble Gonzalo...furnished me from mine own library."

– Prospero’s flashback –
“Noble Gonzal[a]…furnished me from mine own library.”

- Prospero berates Ariel -  "This damned witch Sycorax did confine thee into a cloven pine...it was mine art...that let the out!"

– Prospero berates Ariel –
“This damned witch Sycorax did confine thee into a cloven pine…it was mine art…that let thee out!”

- Caliban (right) challenges Prospero -  "This island's mine, by Sycorax my mother..."

– Caliban (right) challenges Prospero –
“This island’s mine, by Sycorax my mother…”

- L-R: Ferdinand, Ariel, and Prospero -  Prospero freezes Ferdinand with a spell.

– L-R: Ferdinand, Ariel, and Prospero –
Prospero freezes Ferdinand with a spell.

- L-R: Sebastian, Antonio, and King Alonso -  King Alonso weeps for his lost son, Ferdinand.

– L-R: Sebastian, Antonio, King Alonso, Gonzala –
King Alonso weeps for his lost son, Ferdinand.

- Ariel (centre) wakes King Alonso and Gonzala, just as Antonio (left) and Sebastian (right) were about to kill them -  "Why are you drawn?"

– Ariel (centre) wakes King Alonso and Gonzala, just as Antonio (left) and Sebastian (right) were about to kill them –

- Caliban -  [Prospero's] spirits hear me, do hiss me into madness."

– Caliban –
[Prospero’s] spirits hear me, do hiss me into madness.”

- Trinculo examines Caliban -  "What have we here? A man or a fish? Dead or alive?

– Trinculo examines Caliban –
“What have we here? A man or a fish? Dead or alive?

- Trinculo (left) and Sebastian rejoice -  "O [we] escaped!"

– Trinculo (left) and Sebastian rejoice –
“O [we] escaped!”

- L-R: Prospero, Miranda, and Ferdinand -

– L-R: Prospero, Miranda, and Ferdinand –

- Ferdinand -  "I am a prince, Miranda. Hear my soul speak."

– Ferdinand –
“I am a prince, Miranda. Hear my soul speak.”

- Miranda and Ferdinand -  "Here is my hand."

– Miranda and Ferdinand –
“Here is my hand.”

- Stephano (right) conspires with Caliban - "Monster, I will kill this man."

– In rehearsal, Caliban (left) shares his story with Stephano –
“I say by sorcery he got this isle.”

- L-R: Trinculo, Stephano, and Caliban -  "Monster, I will kill this man."

– L-R: Trinculo, Stephano, and Caliban –
“Monster, I will kill this man.”

- L-R: King Alonso, Sebastian, Antonio -  Sebastian: "The next advantage we will take."

– L-R: King Alonso, Sebastian, Antonio –
Sebastian: “The next advantage we will take.”

- A mysterious feast -

– A mysterious feast –

- Ariel (left) as a harpy - "You are three men of sin."

– Ariel (left) as a harpy –
“You are three men of sin.”

- L-R: Miranda, Prospero, and Ferdinand -  "O Ferdinand, take my daughter..."

– L-R: Miranda, Prospero, and Ferdinand –
“O Ferdinand, take my daughter…”

- L-R: Juno, Miranda, Ferdinand, Prospero, Iris, and Ceres -  Iris: "Come, nymphs, and celebrate a contract of true love..."

– L-R: Juno, Miranda, Ferdinand, Prospero, Iris, and Ceres –
Iris: “Come, nymphs, and celebrate a contract of true love…”

- Prospero (left) and King Alonso -  Prospero: "I have lost a daughter."

– Prospero (left) and King Alonso –
Prospero: “I have lost a daughter.”

- Prospero's last words -  "As you from crimes would pardon'd be, let your indulgence set me free."

– Prospero’s last words –
“As you from crimes would pardon’d be, let your indulgence set me free.”

- The amazing cast! -

– The amazing cast! –

Twisted Lit Books – Shakespeare Meets YA

Twisted Lit Books Kim Askew & Amy Helmes

Twisted Lit Books
Kim Askew & Amy Helmes

Guest Post by “Twisted Lit” authors Kim Askew and Amy Helmes

 
People often ask us why we decided to base our new “Twisted Lit” series of YA books off the works of William Shakespeare. Well, as total Shakespeare geeks (and if you’re reading this, we’re guessing you are, too), it was a no-brainer. Since long before we started writing together, we’ve been fans of unique Shakespeare stagings, from MacHomer — Rick Miller’s ingenious one-man mash-up of Macbeth and The Simpsons, to the L.A.-based Troubies’ productions, which combine the playwright with 20th-century pop music. (A recent favorite: A Midsummer Saturday Night’s Fever Dream.)

In addition to being suckers for quirky and offbeat interpretations of the Bard’s works, we’re equally inspired by the timelessness of what he wrote. His thrilling plots and universal themes are perfectly suited to the sort of page-turning, culturally-relevant stories we want to convey. And, when you consider that so many of Shakespeare’s most famous characters are young adults grappling with dysfunctional families and falling in love (uh, Romeo & Juliet, anyone?) — you could almost say he was one of the original “YA” authors!

Here’s the skinny on the first two novels in our series:
 

tempestuous_HC

TEMPESTUOUS: In this updated spin on The Tempest, former “it girl” Miranda has been banished from the popular crowd and forced to work at the dreaded mall food court. When a snowstorm strands her and her high school cohorts overnight in the mall, she uses the opportunity to take sweet revenge on her ex-boyfriend and a trio of former bffs.

 

exposurecoverEXPOSURE: Our modern interpretation of Macbeth takes place over the course of one year in an Alaskan high school. Heroine Skye has a gigantic crush on Craig, the boy who would be Prom King. But when his ambitions (and his social-climbing, sociopathic girlfriend) get the best of him, tragedy and hidden truths spiral dangerously out of control.

 

From the sad-but-true files: A recent study out of England found that nearly a third of all schoolchildren under the age of 13 hadn’t heard of the UK’s most celebrated writer. (The stats for adults weren’t much better.) While our books are meant to entertain, pure and simple, we certainly wouldn’t mind if they turned more teens on to the original plays that inspired them. Just check out our Twisted Lit promo. video below and you’ll understand why we believe you’re never too young to take on Shakespeare!
 

 

_______________________________________________

Amy_Kim_bookportraits_2012_0029rt_crop

Kim (right) and Amy (left)

Twisted Lit Books

Twisted Lit on Facebook

@kaskew and @amyhelmes