Love

SIA Poll- Which Shakespeare character would you want to be your Valentine?

Shakespeare is known for creating some of the most famous (yet sometimes, tragic) lovers in literature. Would you want any of them to be your Valentine? Take the poll!

Give your real Valentine a unique gift this Valentine’s Day- Shakespeare Sonnets by Kids! They are selling fast, so be sure to get yours now!

SIA is also celebrating Valentine’s Day with our friends at DFilms with a Romeo and Juliet DVD and Blu-Ray Giveaway!

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Shakespeare Relationship Stats- Kate and Petruchio

What better way to kick off the week leading up to Valentine’s Day than with a look at the love stats of one of Shakespeare’s most famous couples- Kate and Petruchio from The Taming of the Shrew!

Occupation
Petruchio: Gold-digger
Kate: Shrew

Family status
Petruchio: Recently orphaned
Kate: Elder daughter, Daddy’s second favourite

Reputation
Petruchio: “Why, he’s a devil, a devil, a very fiend.” (Gremio’s opinion, 3.2.154)
Kate: “Why, she’s a devil, a devil, the devil’s dam” (Tranio’s opinion, 3.2.155)

What they wanted from this relationship
Petruchio:
“I come to wive it wealthily in Padua;
If wealthily then happily in Padua.” (1.2.74-75)

“…we have ‘greed so well together
That upon Sunday is the wedding day” (2.1.190-191

Kate: “I’ll see thee hanged on Sunday first” (2.1.192)

How they met
It was quite a rocky start for these two. Both Katherine and Petruchio have…strong opinions, which get them into explosive situations. But on the upside, their first conversation is also their first fight (2.1.182-271), so that’s one relationship hurdle over and done with!

Top 3 bumps on the way to true love
1. The day they meet
There is friction in their relationship right from the beginning. Petruchio is in it for the money, while Kate isn’t in it for anything. In fact, she’d much prefer that it didn’t happen at all. She puts up a good fight, but as we are in the Elizabethan era, and she is the daughter of a wealthy gentleman with a reputation to protect, it’s her word against Petruchio’s. And he has no problem bending the truth to Kate’s father, Old Baptista:

“O, the kindest Kate!
She hung about my neck, and kiss on kiss
She vied so fast, protesting oath on oath,
That in a twink she won me her love.” (2.1.300-303)

2. The wedding
For a wedding that was thrown together by the bride’s family in the space of a week, very little of the drama is on Kate’s end. Petruchio shows up late, dressed in raggedy mismatched clothes, swears through the ceremony, assaults the priest, knocks back a bottle of wine and spews it in his guests’ faces. Not exactly anyone’s idea of a fairytale wedding.

3. The “honeymoon”
In true Petruchio fashion, he abuses his servants, sends away perfectly good food, spends all night making their bed and loudly complaining, “and amid this hurly [he intends] / That all is done in reverent care of her” (4.1.189-190).

Happily ever after
At the point when Petruchio tries to convince Kate that the burning midday day sun is, in fact, the moon, she finally give sin and accepts the fact that she has married a madman. Petruchio’s prediction at the beginning of the play that “where two raging fires meet together, / They do consume the thing that feeds their fury” (2.1.132-33) has finally come true, and these two raging fires live madly ever after.

Will it last?
Who better to set the devil up with than the devil’s dam? The (hell)fire of love between Kate and Petruchio is an eternal flame.

Sonnets by Kids- A 7 year-olds translation of Sonnet #18

SONNET 18

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer’s lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often in his gold complexion dimm’d;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature’s changing course, untrimm’d;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest:
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this and this gives life to thee.

7-YEAR-OLD’S TRANSLATION

You’re a wonderful person…
When the seasons pass[,] you change.
Your heart will not fade because I write…
Your heart won’t die because you’ll live in the poem.

Give the gift of poetry this Valentine’s Day!
For more information or to purchase a sonnet, click here.

Romeo and Juliet DVD and Blu-Ray Giveaway!

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer’s lease hath all too short a date:

We were lucky enough to snag two copies of the recently released Romeo and Juliet film, just in time for Valentine’s Day!
Thanks to our friends at DFilms, we have one DVD and one Blu-Ray to give away, and you could be a winner!

Since we are getting close to the most romantic day of the year, all you have to do is submit an original love poem (max. 6 lines) along with the following:

  • Your Name
  • Your Age (If you are under 18, make sure to get parental permission first!)
  • Your Mailing Address
  • Your Phone Number
  • Whether you want a DVD or Blu Ray

Submissions should be sent to jenny@shakespeareinaction.org

We will post the winning poems on our blog and social media pages!

*This contest is open to all residents of Canada. Entries can be submitted until 11:59PM EST on Friday, February 14, 2014. Winners will be contacted via e-mail or phone to confirm mailing information.

Shakespeare Sonnets by Kids for Valentine’s Day- Behind the Scenes!

Here’s a behind the scenes look at how our Shakespeare Sonnets by Kids fundraiser works!

For more information, or to purchase a sonnet for your loved one, click here!

Sonnets by Kids- A Unique Gift for Valentine’s Day!

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?” What better cure for the “winter of our discontent”?

This Valentine’s Day, why not give the gift of poetry and let the Bard do the talking!

    • Visit http://www.shakespeareinaction.org/sonnets-by-kids
    • Select and purchase your favourite Shakespeare Sonnet – 18, 24, 29, or 116. (Only $25 CDN)
    • On Valentine’s Day, between 4:30pm and 6:30pm EST, a talented and charming Shakespeare Kid will call your lucky Valentine and recite the sonnet with a heart full of love!
    • A Shakespeare Kid will also sign and mail a personalized copy of the sonnet for your Valentine!

SONNETS BY KIDS are available in Canada, the US, and the UK until Thursday, February 13, 2014 at 5pm EST, while quantities last.
Shakespeare in Action is a charitable not-for-profit organization, dedicated to introducing young people to the magic of Shakespeare, language and live theatre.  All proceeds support our educational programs throughout the GTA!

– Sonnets by Kids for Valentine’s Day 2011 – Photo: Shakespeare in Action

– Sonnets by Kids for Valentine’s Day 2011 – Photo: Shakespeare in Action

– Sonnets by Kids for Valentine’s Day 2012 – Photo: Shakespeare in Action

– Sonnets by Kids for Valentine’s Day 2012 – Photo: Shakespeare in Action

– Sonnets by Kids for Valentine’s Day 2013 – Photo: Shakespeare in Action

– Sonnets by Kids for Valentine’s Day 2013 – Photo: Shakespeare in Action

For more information, or to purchase a sonnet for your loved one, click here!

Photo Friday- Remembering Nelson Mandela

nelson-mandela-shakespeare

Caes.           Cowards die many times before their deaths:
The valiant never taste of death but once.
Of all the wonders that I have yet heard,
It seems to me most strange that men should fear,
Seeing that death, a necessary end,
Will come when it will come.

Today we mark the passing of Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela (1918 – 2013), the champion of human rights in South Africa. Mandela served 27 years in Robben Island prison for his revolutionary efforts to end apartheid in South Africa. While he was in prison, Mandela and his fellow inmates distracted themselves by reading from a tattered copy of the Complete Works of William Shakespeare. The book passed from hand to hand and each inmate annotated a favourite passage. The copy came to be known as the Robben Island bible, and has been displayed in exhibits at the British Museum, The Folger Shakespeare Library, and its home in South Africa.

Mandela’s chosen passage, taken from Julius Caesar, speaks to his bravery and his tenacious spirit. These words also bring comfort as we remember him today. They remind us not to mourn for someone who feared death, but to celebrate the life of someone who was willing to die for his beliefs.