costumes

Shakespeare for Kids Summer Camp- Create Your Own Show!

Campers at the Shakespeare for Kids Summer Camp and Young Company for Teens training program will learn to create props, costumes and a set for their very own Shakespeare production!
Check out the video below to see the great work done by our campers!

What if Shakespeare… ran a HALLOWEEN SHOP?


Something wicked this way comes…

Shakes-store

“Come hither, come, come, come!” [1] “Be truly welcome hither” [2]. “Come, go in: / I’ll show thee some attires” [3]. “What is it you will see?” [4] “Be what thou wilt” [5]. “A Persian Prince” [6] “say you sir?” [7] “I like that well” [8].

“This new and gorgeous garment” [9] “fits the purpose passing well” [10]. “Quick, quick! we’ll come dress you straight: put / On the gown the while” [11].  “I do not like the fashion of your garments. / You’ll say they are Persian attire; but / Let them be chang’d” [12].

“Wouldst thou be” [13] “a gallant knight” [14], “attired like a warrior?” [15] “I’ll give thee, friend, / An armour all of gold” [16]. “It well befits you” [17]. “How like you this?” [18] “Pray you, look not sad” [19], “thou shalt have my best gown” [20].

(to attendant) “Come hither, sirrah” [21], “go fetch / My best attires” [22].

“Well, what would you say” [23] “the queen of all the fairies, / Finely attired in a robe of white” [24]. “I pray you, bear with me” [25]. “Fully satisfied” [26] “will I see thee by and by” [27].

(Aside) “Alack, alack, alack!” [28] “What should I do with him?” [29]

(to attendant) “Sirrah, a word with you” [30]. “Let’s go dress him / Like the witch of Brentford” [31].

“Good sir, draw near to me” [32]. “Behold and see” [33] “a wretched creature” [34], “spotted, detested and abominable” [35]. “So wither’d and so wild in their attire / That look not like the inhabitants o’ the earth” [36]. “What say you?” [37] “Is this the guise?” [38]

“Ay, those attires are best” [39]. “I shall give thee” [40] “a bloody mask” [41] “with great ragg’d horns” [42]. “Pray you, come near” [43], “I’ll tell you true” [44], “I am afraid, sir” [45], “to look upon the hideous” [46], “monstrous form” [47] “I see before me” [48].  “I pray thee, mark me” [49] – “with you in this garb” [50] “thou art assured” [51] “to fright the world” [52]. “And yet, I know thou wilt” [53] “win the prize” [54], “for thou look’st” [55] “second to none” [56].

Shakespeare re-arranged by Linda Nicoll

1. Anthony and Cleopatra [V. ii. 3441]
2. As You Like It [II. vii. 1096]
3. Much Ado About Nothing [III. i. 1179-80]
4. Hamlet [V. ii. 4027]
5. Henry VI. P I [V. iii. 2503]
6. The Merchant of Venice [II. i. 540
7. Cymbeline [IV. ii. 2794]
8. Pericles [II. v. 32]
9. Henry IV. P II [V. ii. 3292]
10. Titus Andronicus [II. iii. 819]
11. Merry Wives of Windsor [IV. ii. 2040-41]
12. King Lear [III. vi. 80-82]
13. Anthony and Cleopatra [IV. xiv. 3067]
14. Henry IV. P I [V. iii. 2901]
15. Cymbeline [V. iv. 3168]
16. Anthony and Cleopatra [IV. viii. 2816-17]
17. Henry IV. P II [III. ii. 1934]
18. As You Like It [III. ii. 1133]
19. Anthony and Cleopatra [III. ii. 2128]
20. Pericles [II. i. 741]
21. Measure for Measure [IV. ii. 1886]
22. Anthony and Cleopatra [V. ii. 3673-74]
23. All’s Well That End Well [II. v. 1348]
24. Merry Wives of Windsor [IV. iv. 2269-70]
25. As You Like It [II. iv. 729-30]
26. Henry VIII [II. iv. 1518]
27. Henry IV. P I [V. iv. 3073]
28. A Midsummer Night’s Dream [V. i. 2015]
29. Much Ado About Nothing [II. i. 426]
30. Macbeth [III. i. 1051]
31. Merry Wives of Windsor [IV. ii. 2055-56]
32. Comedy of Errors [V. i. 1436]
33. Anthony and Cleopatra [I. i. 16]
34. Julius Caesar [I. ii. 207]
35. Titus Andronicus [II. iii. 810]
36. Macbeth [I. iii. 140-41]
37. Pericles [II. i. 595]
38. Henry VI. P II [I. iii. 433]
39. Romeo and Juliet [IV. iii. 2549]
40. Anthony and Cleopatra [IV. xii. 2940]
41. Henry IV. P I [III. ii. 1960]
42. Merry Wives of Windsor [IV. iv. 2226]
43. Merry Wives of Windsor [III. iii. 1524]
44. Timon of Athens [I. ii. 582]
45. Taming of the Shrew [V. ii. 2589]
46. Henry IV. P II [II. iii. 1189]
47. Henry IV. P II [IV. ii. 2476]
48. Macbeth [II. i. 611]
49. The Tempest [I. ii. 189]
50. Hamlet [II. ii. 1456]
51. Sonnet 92 [2]
52. Henry VI. P II [III. ii. 1731]
53. Cymbeline [V. v. 3488]
54. Taming of the Shrew [II. i. 1195]
55. Pericles [V. i. 2323]
56. Comedy of Errors [V. i. 1430]

Shakespeare image: http://www.clipartmojo.com/shakespeare.html
Halloween image:  http://www.gograph.com/stock-illustration/tomb.html

A Fun Photo Friday!

Introducing: the office antics of Shakespeare in Action!

With the school year almost done, we thought we’d share a few of the most memorable moments at the Shakespeare in Action office from the past year.

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Just imagine, if we can have this much fun in our office… how do kids and teens handle all the fun we throw at them in camp?

Register now for a guaranteed summer of fun- these testimonials say it all!

“We love Shakespeare. Thanks for the camp. It was fun. And that is the end.”
Nigel & Marielle Pynn-Coztes – Age 10 & 7

“I think its great fun, I’m more confident with everything” Jessie Marshall-Sheppard – age 8

“This camp was sweet I really enjoyed it. The costumes ruled.” Matthew Benedict – Age 10

Check out the Shakespeare Camp for Kids and Teens

National Shakespeare Youth Festival Update – E.L. Crossley

By: Kelly Nori and Axel Kinnear (designing a set and costumes for Hamlet)

So far, the Shakespeare Festival project has been going very well.  Axel and I are working hard together and using our time effectively.  Recently, we sat down and tried to realistically set goals for finish our project.  We decided that by Monday, April 18 we wanted to have three character drawings done, and we were able to accomplish that goal.  By Friday, April 22 we want to have both of our set drawings done, and by Tuesday, April 26, we want to have everything complete, so that we can focus on our interview during class. We have spent a lot of time considering characters, theme, logistics, etc.; so we are hoping that our project turns out to be very strong.  This week in class we are focusing on the drawing of the set. Today in class we thought up different ideas about our set, and then made some decisions. It has difficult to maintain levels and depth within the set, while also considering the small details of props; in the end, we came up with some unique ideas that were inspired by the line “Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.”  I think that we are on track to finish, and we are continuing to work well with each other. Our goals are set, and now we must complete them!

National Shakespeare Youth Festival Update – E.L. Crossley

By: Kelly Nori and Axel Kinnear (designing a set and costumes for Hamlet)

So far our Shakespeare Festival Project has been going very well.  At the beginning of the planning process, Axel and I decided that I would do most of the research and organization projects, while Axel would focus more on drawing. During class time, Axel and I have chosen the characters that we want to design costumes for, and discussed their traits and physical appearance; finally, we came up with certain colours and styles we wanted them to wear.

We also discussed the set, and how to achieve levels and depth, but still keeping it cohesive with the looks of our clothing. I have done some research outside of school about the laws related to clothing in the Elizabethan period, and architecture during that time as well. This research has helped Axel and I get much work done during class, because we know the certain rules that must be followed, and we can design based on ‘what is allowed.’

Axel will do some drawings outside of school in the next few days, so that we are sure to keep the project moving at a steady pace. We plan to have the project completed by at least April 21, so that we can edit anything that we are not happy with and prepare ourselves for the interview on the actual day of the Shakespeare festival.

Overall, we have had a great start to the project and we enjoy working on it. It’s fun to consider characters in a new way and think about what they may wear based on who they are as a person. This project has also allowed us to use our creative minds collaboratively to come up with some good ideas related to Hamlet. I am excited to see some of the sketches being formed, and eventually excited to see the stage layout (considering I am much more skilled with stage management). I think that Axel is enjoying the project as well and looks forward to using his knowledge of art to create extraordinary costume designs that will make the characters come to life. We are working well as a team, and seem to get most of our work done outside of class; overall we are on track for the festival on April 27.

National Shakespeare Youth Festival Guidelines: Design

How To… Design Sets and Costumes

Participants: 1 – 3 students

What you’ll need to present:

In-Schools Festival: Renderings for costumes for AT LEAST 5 separate characters; AND ground plans and front-perspective drawings showing your ideas for a set design. You can visit the Virtual Shakespeare Lab for examples of each.

National Festival: In addition to the above, students must provide fabric swatches for costumes, a SECOND drawing for each of the 5 characters, and a basic paper-model of the set design. You will also need to contribute to the Festival blog each week, so make sure you keep your entries up to date!

Keep in mind: When developing your ideas, imagine you are designing costumes and set for a real full-scale production with an endless budget! Students should justify how the design relates to the play and why this design has been chosen.

For more tips and info, click below!

(more…)

A behind the scenes tour of A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Today we open A Midsummer Night’s Dream at Central Commerce Collegiate!  We’re very excited to present our first mainstage production in our new home and we’ve invited pretty much everyone we know.  In honour of the event, we thought we’d give you a behind the scenes look at what’s been going on to prepare us for the occasion!

First up: the set!  Here is what it’s going to look like, more or less:

Here is what our stage will look like...

Danger! Lightbulbs sometimes break, thank goodness someone made a sign...I would've cartwheeled otherwise!

One room out of our three was dedicated to building the set and backdrop.  While touring with my camera, I encountered the above sign on the door.  It must have been quite the adventure in that room as everything was coming together!  So here’s a look at how the backdrop and trees were made by cutting trunks from canvas and painting them to look like multi-coloured tree trunks.

Making the backdrop: measuring triangles!

A box full of colours!

Resourcefulness leads to recycled paint containers.

The mess remains...

Now that we have the stage under control, it’s time to clothe those actors! So bust out that sewing machine, we’re making costumes.  And masks, many masks!

Let's get sewing!

Costumes, as organized by character...

The sketches are up next to the sewing machine...

Oberon's cape of feathers...an adventure in hot glue!

A few finished masks and a lot of art supplies!

Mixing paint to make masks...

A finished mask...and more sketches.

And that is all we’re going to show you! If you want to see the rest, you’ll have to come see our show…