Comedy of Errors

TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club – Winter Registration Opens December 1st!

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“…my library / Was dukedom large enough…”
– Prospero, The Tempest, 1.2 –

The TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club is a FREE readers’ theatre program for Bards-to-be, ages 7-12!

Join Shakespeare in Action for storytelling adventures!  Explore worlds of magic, ghosts, silly mix-ups, and swordplay in some of the greatest stories ever told!

Jump into plays like Romeo & Juliet, Macbeth, Midsummer Night’s Dream, Tempest, Comedy of Errors, and Henry IV.

Play drama games, read aloud from one to three scripts, build confidence, get a head start on high school, and make friends with other Shakespeare fans!

The TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club is led by professional actors and educators. Register in person at your chosen participating Toronto Public Library branch from the list below:

SATURDAYS, January 30 – March 5, 2016
Registration Opens December 1, 2015

Morning  (10AM – 12PM)

Afternoon  (2PM – 4PM)

Help us spread the word by sharing this post through your social media outlets!

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TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club – Extend your young Bard’s learning with these click-and-print resources!

...and act a little out.

Are your young Bards participating in the Fall session of the TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club?  Or have they participated in the past?

If so, we have some free click-and-print activities for them to try at home and extend their learning!

Click here, scroll to the bottom of the page, and click the green “Download Now” button.

Registration for the Winter session opens December 1st!  For more information click here.

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TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club – Fall Registration Opens October 1st!

td-shakespeare-for-kids-library-club

“…my library / Was dukedom large enough…”
– Prospero, The Tempest, 1.2 –

The TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club is a FREE readers’ theatre program for Bards-to-be, ages 7-12!

Join Shakespeare in Action for storytelling adventures!  Explore worlds of magic, ghosts, silly mix-ups, and swordplay in some of the greatest stories ever told!

Jump into plays like Romeo & Juliet, Macbeth, Midsummer Night’s Dream, Tempest, Comedy of Errors, and Henry IV.

Play drama games, read aloud from one to three scripts, build confidence, get a head start on high school, and make friends with other Shakespeare fans!

The TD Shakespeare for Kids Library Club is led by professional actors and educators. Register in person at your chosen participating Toronto Public Library branch from the list below:

SATURDAYS, November 7 – December 12, 2015
Registration Opens October 1, 2015

Morning  (10AM – 12PM)

Afternoon  (2PM – 4PM)

Help us spread the word by sharing this post through your social media outlets!

 shakespeare-in-action-logo     td-bank-logo
toronto-public-library-logo

The Shakespeare Challenge 2015!

Artistic Director, Michael Kelly in action

Our Artistic Director – Michael Kelly – in action

Michael introduces The Comedy of Errors: 12 community actors, 8 rehearsals, 1 show - a gala fundraiser in support of access to the arts!

Michael introduces The Comedy of Errors: 12 community actors, 8 rehearsals, 1 show – a gala fundraiser in support of access to the arts!

IMG_2201 Shakespeare in Action - Shakespeare Challenge - 2015 - Welcome to Ephesus

Welcome to Ephesus…

Adriana mistakes Antipholus of Syracuse for her husband, Antipholus' identical twin.

…where Adriana mistakes Antipholus of Syracuse for her husband, Antipholus of Ephesus…

Antipholus of Ephesus and Dromio of Ephesus are locked out of their home.

…and Antipholus of Ephesus is locked out of his home, while Antipholus of Syracuse dines with Adriana. Dromio of Syracuse guards the door.

Antipholus of Syracuse declares his love for Luciana...Adriana's sister.

It’s only a matter of time before Antipholus of Syracuse falls for Luciana…Adriana’s sister…

...and the Courtezan becomes tangled in the mess.

…and the Courtezan becomes tangled in the mess.

Dromio of Ephesus, mistaken for his twin - Dromio of Syracuse - gets a beating.

Poor Dromio of Ephesus, mistaken for his twin – Dromio of Syracuse – gets a beating.

What is going on?

What is going on?

The twins meet.  Egeon re-unites with his sons, Antipholus...and Antipholus.

After much chaos, all twins meet. Egeon re-unites with his sons, Antipholus…and Antipholus. (Why would anyone give his twins the same name?)

Antipholus of Syracuse and Luciana

Antipholus of Syracuse declares his love for Luciana…again.

Wordy Wednesday – “High time”

Here’s another Wordy Wednesday about time. I can’t really pinpoint why I enjoy discussing the subject. The entire thing confounds and confuses, what with its many concepts regarding relativity, linearity, chronology etc… And yet I’m still drawn to it. Right then, High Time – synonymous with ‘about time’. It is a phrase that refers to the best or latest time for something to happen. It can also mean that something is overdue and should be done right away. Grammatically speaking, the phrase is often paired with a subjunctive verb in the past tense. While it refers to the past, it is really mentioning the present moment the speaker is talking in.

The phrase is found in Shakespeare’s The Comedy of Errors, III. ii (1590s):

There’s none but witches do inhabit here;
And therefore ’tis high time that I were hence.
She that doth call me husband, even my soul
Doth for a wife abhor. But her fair sister,
Possess’d with such a gentle sovereign grace,
Of such enchanting presence and discourse,
Hath almost made me traitor to myself:
But, lest myself be guilty to self-wrong,
I’ll stop mine ears against the mermaid’s song.

The phrase’s exact definition varies with the context it is placed in. In The Comedy of Errors, Antipholus of Syracuse speaks of his desire to leave Ephesus, a place filled with ‘witches’ and other women who claim him and Dromio as their husbands. Antipholous could’ve just said “tis time that I were hence”, but “tis high time that I were hence” has a greater sense of immediacy to it.

As in the case above, ‘high time’ is often used to voice a strong opinion. It is a marvellous way to complain about something or someone, with just the right amount of subtleness. Take for example, the ever-pressing suburban annoyance of lawn mowing… ‘It’s high time you mowed the lawn. The grass won’t cut itself’.

Literary uses of the phrase can be found in a variety of sources, such as Tolkien: “It was now past mid-day, and they felt it was high time for lunch” (The Fellowship of the Ring), and Dickens: “…very few words were spoken; and everybody seemd to eat his utmost in self-defence, as if a famine were expected to set in before breakfast time to-morrow morning, and it had become high time to assert the first law of nature” (Martin Chuzzlewit).

And with that, it’s high time I ended this blog entry.

See you on Friday!
– Vineeta

What if Shakespeare was… on American Idol!

american_idol-show1

What if Shakespeare was on American Idol singing a heartbreaking love song for a place in the final?

If music be the food of love, play on, (play on, play on)

Give me excess of it (excess of it) [1]

For stony limits cannot hold love out, (cannot hold)

And what love can do, that dares love attempt [2]

The course of true love never did run smooth [3]

 

O my love! Here’s to my love (Oooooh my love! Here’s to my love) [4]

If thou canst / love me… I say to thee / that I shall die [5]

Take all my loves, my love, yea take them all (yea take them all, all, all) [6]

But love, for love, thus shall excuse my jade [7]

A lover’s eyes will gaze an eagle blind, / A lover’s ear will hear the lowest sound [8]

 

I love thee, I will not say pity me…

But I say, love me (But I say, looooovvve me) [9]

Canst thou love me? (Canst thou love me?) [10]

Most radiant, exquisite, and unmatchable beauty [11]

I love thee more and more: think more and more (think more and more) [12]

 

I have not art to reckon my groans;

But that I love thee best, O most best believe [13]

If thou dost love me [14] O joyful day! (joyful, joyful day) [15]

To say thou dost not [16] O, break my heart! (break, break, break)

Poor bankrupt, break at once! [17]

 

But I say, love me… [18]

 

In this city will I stay / And live alone and [19]

Write sorrow on the bosom of the earth [20]

Ay me!… and twenty times! Woe, woe / And twenty echoes twenty times cry so [21]

 

But I say, love me… [22]

For now my love… I know thou canst [23]

 

By Linda Nicoll

 

References:

1          Twelfth Night I. i. 2-3

2          Romeo & Juliet II. ii. 916-17

3          A Midsummer Night’s Dream I. i. 140

4          Romeo & Juliet V. iii. 3037 & 65

5          Henry V V. ii. 3132-35

6          Sonnet 40, 1

7          Sonnet 51, 12

8          Love’s Labour’s Lost IV, iii. 1679-80

9          Merry Wives of Windsor II. i. 580-81

10        Henry V V. ii. 3176

11        Twelfth Night I. v. 464

12        Cymbeline V. v. 3498

13        Hamlet II. ii. 1216-18

14        Romeo & Juliet I. v. 943

15        Henry IV P II V. iii. 3539

16        All’s Well That Ends Well I. iii. 497

17        Romeo & Juliet III. ii. 1779

18        Merry Wives of Windsor II. i. 581

19        Henry VI P II IV, iv. 2570-71

20        Richard II III. ii. 1557

21        Venus and Adonis 855-6

22        Merry Wives of Windsor II. i. 581

23        Comedy of Errors II. ii 514 & 28

Spotlight on Summer Camp: Kids’ Performances!

Summer is just around the corner, and with it our summer camps! Over the next few weeks, we will be uploading short video segments from our camps demonstrating the value of this summertime experience. Each video showcases a different aspect of our camp.

This week will be our 2011 Kids’ Camp performances of Julius Caesar and A Comedy of Errors!




This year the Kids’ Camp will focus on The Tempest, while our Young Company for Teens will focus on Macbeth.  It’s a great opportunity to learn from a professional actor, work behind the scenes on sets and costumes, build confidence and new friendships. For more information or to register, click here.

But the performance itself is just the tip of the iceberg. What they were up to behind the scenes? Tune in next week, or watch our summer videos on the Shakespeare In Action YouTube channel to find out! Click here.