Photo Friday

Because sometimes a picture speaks louder than words.

Photo Friday- Envelopes! Envelopes Everywhere!

Today, the SIA team spent a better portion of the day gathered at the meeting table. For what, you say? Why, stuffing envelopes of course!
We are excited to announce that our popular interactive touring program, Shakespeare Alive will be returning this Spring! The tour will start on March 31, and run until April 11. We are visiting schools across Toronto and the GTA, so make sure to book your school now!

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Rosemary is focused on getting through her pile of flyers!

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The wall between me and Rosemary is growing by the minute! And we weren’t even half finished at this point!

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Photo Friday- Romeo and Juliet… The Video Game?

Happy Friday everyone. This week was a rather difficult choice between an image from Romeo: Wherefore art Thou, the Romeo and Juliet Video Game, and a monkey dressed as Hamlet (yes a monkey I’m not kidding this time, thanks Google). The final verdict: an image from Romeo: Wherefore Art Thou. The cool thing about video games is that they provide an extremely accessible and fun outlet to pay tribute to a particular play and/or playwright. I first found out about the idea of video games as a means of paying tribute to a particular play through an accidental discovery of the <em “mso-bidi-font-style:=”” normal”=””>Waiting For Godot video game, based on Samuel Beckett’s Waiting For Godot where you…(you probably guessed it) wait.

A recent discovery: there are <strong “mso-bidi-font-weight:=”” normal”=””>Shakespeare video games all over the place, both online and in a computer game format. A popular video game tribute to the work of William Shakespeare: Veronaville in the Sims 2, a neighborhood in the Sims 2 virtual landscape filled with characters named after characters from Romeo And Juliet and Midsummer Nights Dream that look like and have relationships with each other identical to the characters they are named after.

The picture below comes from another Shakespeare tribute video game. This one’s called Romeo: Wherefore Art Thou. In Romeo: Wherefore Art Thou, you’re Romeo, and as Romeo you go on adventures, which include activities such as jumping across cliffs in order to find Juliet. From what I’ve heard based on reading about it online it has a style similar to the Mario party video games. An image from the Romeo: Wherefore Art Thou video game is below:

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Another Photo Friday! Shakespeare’s Star Wars

Happy Friday everyone. Do I ever have a treat for you! Do you like Star Wars? Do you like Shakespeare? Do you like Star Wars and Shakespeare? Guess what? You no longer need to choose between your love for Shakespeare’s plays and your love for George Lucas’ Star Wars series thanks to Ian Doescher’s Shakespeare remix of one of the script of one of the Star Wars movies. I found this randomly online one day and I thought I’d take a minute to share with all of you lovely readers my accidental discovery that is now on my long term book wish list and, if you love the idea of Shakespeare style Star Wars and think it’s as silly and genius as I do I’m sure you’re as enthusiastic and intrigued as I am. There’s also a more in depth description of the book on the thinkgeek website  and check out this book trailer that explains the book’s concept.

In a nut shell the focus of my Friday post is the William Shakespeare’s Star Wars as pictured below.  Fun fact: everything from the illustrations, to the text are done in a Shakespeare meets Star Wars style:

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Photo Friday- Remembering Nelson Mandela

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Caes.           Cowards die many times before their deaths:
The valiant never taste of death but once.
Of all the wonders that I have yet heard,
It seems to me most strange that men should fear,
Seeing that death, a necessary end,
Will come when it will come.

Today we mark the passing of Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela (1918 – 2013), the champion of human rights in South Africa. Mandela served 27 years in Robben Island prison for his revolutionary efforts to end apartheid in South Africa. While he was in prison, Mandela and his fellow inmates distracted themselves by reading from a tattered copy of the Complete Works of William Shakespeare. The book passed from hand to hand and each inmate annotated a favourite passage. The copy came to be known as the Robben Island bible, and has been displayed in exhibits at the British Museum, The Folger Shakespeare Library, and its home in South Africa.

Mandela’s chosen passage, taken from Julius Caesar, speaks to his bravery and his tenacious spirit. These words also bring comfort as we remember him today. They remind us not to mourn for someone who feared death, but to celebrate the life of someone who was willing to die for his beliefs.

Photo Friday- Jude Law as Hamlet

Those of you who have been following our blog, website, Twitter feed, and/or Facebook page are probably aware that Hamlet is being performed next week here at Shakespeare in Action from December 2-6th. If you didn’t know about our production of Hamlet and/or you’re interested in attending, I highly recommend you read the section on the Shakespeare in Action website on our Hamlet production.

The last time I found a photo of a Shakespeare actor and posted it as the blog’s photo friday, the picture was of Edwin Booth, a Victorian era actor who toured as a leading Shakespeare actor. This time I found a contemporary leading actor, portraying the role of Hamlet.

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Around 2011, Jude Law starred as Hamlet in a Broadway production of Hamlet. It got mixed reviews, but it continued the tradition of A-list Hollywood actors giving theatrical productions renown and a great deal of media attention. Edwin Booth and Jude Law bring identical levels of attention to Shakespeare’s work in a way that’s reflective of their time, which is why I have picture of both of them on the blog. Take a look at the two Hamlet leading actors. Do you see any similarities or differences (besides the time period/setting difference)? Which one fits how you picture the ‘look’ of Hamlet’s lead actor?

If you haven’t seen the Edwin Booth as Hamlet themed photo Friday and you want to compare the two actors here’s the link to that particular blog post, with the photo included: (https://shakespeareinaction.wordpress.com/2013/10/25/photo-friday-hamlet-history/)

Photo Friday- Hamlet and His Advisors

As you may be aware, Shakespeare in Action turns 25 this year (we’re all grown up!), so you’ll forgive us if we’ve been caught up in nostalgia lately. Photo Friday lends the perfect opportunity to take a look back, quite literally, at our long and storied history. And since the first show of our 25th anniversary season is Hamlet, let’s take a peek at this priceless relic from the early days of Shakespeare in Action.

In this scene, advisors to Hamlet (i.e. students from a local secondary school) gather around to give the prince some much-needed counsel.

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(Bonus points if you can deduce based on hairstyle alone in which decade of our illustrious history this photo was taken!)